British Columbia Travel Guide
The unofficial BC Travel & Tourism Guide
From the elevation of the Pender Island Southís highest point, Mount Norman, you can experience a birdís eye view of the surrounding islands and harbours. The Georgia Strait is home to dozens of neigbouring lush grean islands. There are many wonderful pebbled beaches to sit and enjoy. Providing you have the equipment (or rents can be booked on Pender Island North), getting out in the water with a kayak or canoe is a great way to spend time exploring the hidden inlets and shores.

The sister island, Pender Island North is home to a laid-back community of less than 1,800 people and there are some necessities (e.g. gas station, grocery store), resorts, bed and breakfasts, Saturday Farmers Markets and galleries with local arts.

Population: 200

Highlights:
Bird Watching
Markets & Crafts
Scooter Rentals
Camping

Things To Bring:
Attention boaters - Bedwell harbour, during the summer months is the acting Canadian Customs port for travelers journeying from the United States.

History:
For over 8,000 years or more, families of the Coast Salish First Nations used the island shores for making short term or long term stays while fishing and hunting in the area. The time of year generally determines the location of the fish runs during the various months. The First Nation bands learned of these runs and carved themselves cedar wood canoes and hand fashioned fishing lines or nets to harvest fish and even smoke the fish to preserve it for winter.

In the late 1800ís one of the first settlements to the island was a sheep farm now located in an area reserved as Beaumont Park in 1963. Pender Island South has remained rural and small with efforts from the residents and surrounding island community in hopes of preserving its natural wilderness and charm.

Climate:
Summer average 18 degrees Celsius
Winter average 4 degrees Celsius

 

Pender Island South Accommodations


Pender Island South Things to Do